Graphic Novel · Review · Science Fiction · Young Adult

Twilight: The Graphic Novel, Vol. 2, by Stephenie Meyer | Book Review

Adapting the last half of Twilight into a graphic novel, Young Kim keeps her beautiful artwork while completing a disappointing conclusion to the novel. For those who missed the Twilight hype and don’t care about spoilers, Twilight: The Graphic Novel, Vol. 2, starts with Bella meeting Edward’s vampire family and has a vampire hunting….

Graphic Novel · Review · Science Fiction · Young Adult

Twilight: The Graphic Novel, Vol. 1 by Stephenie Meyer | Book Review

It’s been years since I last reread Twilight, by Stephenie Meyer, and I was a Twihard back then. I remember wanting to read and own the graphic novel adaptation, even though I believed it wouldn’t be as good as the novel, but I didn’t do either until this year. Young Kim adapted Twilight into a beautiful graphic novel that is pretty accurate to the original book. This review comes from the perspective of having read the novel it’s based on and not being such a Twihard anymore.

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Remembering New Moon for the Motorcycle Scenes

This week’s theme of the I Heart Characters! Meme is a Biker. Most of the bikers I’ve encountered in fiction are in movies or urban fantasy novels. The bikers I will talk about today are from a very mainstream YA novel: New Moon by Stephenie Meyer. If you haven’t read New Moon, Bella has been… Continue reading Remembering New Moon for the Motorcycle Scenes

Graphic Novel · Modern Fantasy · Review

Tokyo Ghoul, Vol. 2, by Sui Ishida

Ghouls look like and live like humans, except they eat human flesh. Ken Kaneki is a human-Ghoul hybrid due to an accident that gave him the organs of a Ghoul. He is learning about life as a Ghoul by learning to act human, seeing the humanity in Ghouls, and avoiding contact with the “Doves,” investigators who kill and torture all Ghouls without consideration of which is good and which is bad. Volume 2 of Tokyo Ghoul, by Sui Ishida, is the volume that humanizes Ghouls.

Graphic Novel · Modern Fantasy · Review

Tokyo Ghoul, Vol. 1, by Sui Ishida | Accept It. Humans Are Delicious.

Society contains humans and Ghouls, who look and behave like humans most of the time. One problem: the Ghouls must eat humans to survive. Ken Kaneki, a human in this society, is thrilled to go on a date with the woman he likes, but it turns out she only wants to eat him. After an accident and a dubious rescue, he transforms into human-Ghoul hybrid. Now Ken has to survive Ghoul wars, learn the ways of Ghoul society, and come to terms with his existence as a half-Ghoul. The first volume of Tokyo Ghoul, by Sui Ishida, explores a transformation into that of a monster and the way one man copes with this horrific change.

Modern Fantasy · Review · Young Adult

The Raven Boys by Maggie Stiefvater

Synopsis from Inside Cover: “There are only two reasons a non-seer would see a spirit on St. Mark’s Eve. Either you’re his true love … or you killed him.” Every year, Blue Sargent stands next to her clairvoyant mother as soon-to-be dead walk past. Blue never sees them — until this year, when a boy… Continue reading The Raven Boys by Maggie Stiefvater

Modern Fantasy · Review · Young Adult

Raised by Wolves by Jennifer Lynn Barnes

Synopsis from Inside Cover: At the age of four, Bryn watched a rogue werewolf brutally murder her parents. Alone in the world, she was rescued and taken in by the mysterious Callum, the alpha of his werewolf pack. Now fifteen, Bryn’s been raised as a human among werewolves, adhering to pack rule (mostly). Little fazes… Continue reading Raised by Wolves by Jennifer Lynn Barnes

Modern Fantasy · Review · Young Adult

Lies Beneath by Anne Greenwood Brown

Lies Beneath, by Anne Greenwood Brown, is a Great Lakes mermaid novel. It is part of the Lies Beneath series. Synopsis from Goodreads: Calder White lives in the cold, clear waters of Lake Superior, the only brother in a family of murderous mermaids. To survive, Calder and his sisters prey on humans and absorb their… Continue reading Lies Beneath by Anne Greenwood Brown